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As many of you know, we're moving to new digs shortly. This is an in-town move, and I know from prior experience that our cable provider's network is pretty flat. So, I had some hope when I called Cox that they'd tell me that I could keep my current static IP addresses at the new place. Nothing doing. I was assured that I would need new static IPs because I would be moving from one node to another. Each time the word node was spoken, the Cox person uttered it as if it were a holy syllable, like OM, or god.

Now this didn't sit right with me. Some dude from across town fat-fingered his IP assignments a couple of years ago and stepped on two of my 'assigned' addresses. I've seen traffic from all sorts of hosts on a bunch of different subnets flow by. So I decided to conduct an experiment.

I have four static IPs assigned to me, but I'm currently only using three. Last night when we were playing real estate refugees (5:30 PM showing) at my folks' place, I configured my laptop with my spare IP and plugged it into their cable modem. At first nothing, but after resetting the modem, viola!. I was cruising around on the 'net just fine. I repeated the experiment again today at my in-laws' place. Same result.

I am now pretty sure that the entire town of Glastonbury is served by one node. I even know right where it is: 1000 Chestnut Hill Road.

Because I have the Virgo nature (in spades), I decided to do a packet trace to see how flat is it?. The table below is populated from IP ARPs seen in a ~1000 frame capture (that would be Wireshark to Access to Excel to HTML). Cox is currently multinetting approximately 25 different IP subnets across the local wire. I could grab an address from any of these 25 subnets and just start banging away ... or intentionally grab someone else's address and hose them. I don't mean to be critical of the pros from Atlanta, but that's a mighty loose way to run a railroad.

IP SrcKnown
Subnet
Probable
Subnet
Possible
Subnet
Shortest
Mask
Notes
24.249.26.161
 
 
 
27
 
68.109.116.1
 
1
 
24
 
68.15.61.33
 
 
1
26
bit boundary + 1
68.230.158.1
 
1
 
24
 
68.9.112.1
 
1
 
24
 
68.9.92.1
 
1
 
24
 
68.99.153.97
 
 
1
27
bit boundary + 1
68.99.159.65
 
 
1
26
bit boundary + 1
70.164.242.129
1
 
 
27
HoH IPs allocated from here
70.167.16.65
 
 
1
26
bit boundary + 1
70.167.21.33
 
 
1
27
bit boundary + 1
70.168.0.129
 
 
1
25
 
70.181.16.1
 
1
 
24
 
70.183.10.33
 
 
1
27
bit boundary + 1
70.186.17.1
 
1
 
24
 
72.192.0.1
 
1
 
24
 
72.200.164.1
 
1
 
24
 
72.209.28.1
 
1
 
24
 
98.160.16.1
 
1
 
24
 
98.160.17.1
 
1
 
24
 
98.161.78.1
 
1
 
24
 
98.170.149.1
 
1
 
24
 
98.174.83.193
 
 
1
27
bit boundary + 1
98.174.85.129
 
 
1
25
bit boundary + 1
98.175.86.1
 
1
 
24
 
98.182.38.1
 
1
 
24
 

 
1   +
15   +
9
=
25

Comments

( 1 comment — Leave a comment )
webwyrm
Nov. 11th, 2008 09:31 pm (UTC)
Sounds like a nice opportunity for either of the following messages:
a) Hi, wanna hire me to fix this system? Followed by enough data to scare them, but not suggest you are blackmailing them...
b) Hi, FYI- you might want to tighten up here...

These days, I'm big on the money-grubbing, hence the first reaction.
( 1 comment — Leave a comment )

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